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101 Scout... going to take a while

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  • #31
    Hey Tom,I am curious why you would shorten the trans tower.I am not to familiar with 101's,more chiefs.
    I ask because I have a tower similar to chief but shorter,which I thought was later scout but may be other.
    Tom

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    • #32
      The 101 came only with a front wheel and hub, well not exactly... the rear hub and wheel were Henderson so I traded that assembly for the correct Indian hub. I purchased a new drop center rim and proceeded to unlace the clincher from the front hub and drum. It actually went very well, I simply applied a few drops of Kroil to each nipple from the inside and was able to get them off without too much trouble. My plan, unless I get talked out of it, is to use the original spokes and nipples on the new rim... as long as there's enough thread on the spokes because the drop center nipple holes are a shorter distance to the hub than the original.



      BTW, the original clincher has some markings inside (and I don't need this rim, hate to toss it so if you have a need for one then let me know!)

      Pisten Bulley is Harry Roberts in Vermont.

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      • #33
        I also built an engine stand. I wanted a stand that can accommodate engine alone and also with the gearbox bolted up, so I made the base leg long and made two different vertical mounting brackets. To use the stand with the gearbox attached I'll remove the front mount for engine only and add the rear mount to hold the gearbox mounting point once they're bolted together.

        Pisten Bulley is Harry Roberts in Vermont.

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        • #34
          Very nice looking seat and the reworking of the parts. On the front springy tongue portions of the seat mount what holds the pin in the frame bracket. Or is that a bolt. Can't see that detail.

          Mike Love

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          • #35
            Mike, this is what was in there. I'm not certain if it's correct, and if so if it should be nickel or painted.... another detail to learn down the road!

            Pisten Bulley is Harry Roberts in Vermont.

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            • #36
              Tom, mines a Chout build and far from stock - 1930 frame 101 and highly modified 47 Chief engine. With cylinders that were shortened almost 2 inches, so that it would go into a stock 101 frame - that's why I had to cut the trans tower, also my trans is one of the new 4 speed overdrives :-)

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              • #37
                I got a bit of interesting information on my front wheel hub this morning (thanks to the sharp eyes of Dave on the Caimag site), until he mentioned the dished flange away from the brake side, I had never paid attention. Brake drum, spoke count, and rim size all looked good.... but this is not the correct hub! I measured it up and it's way wrong.... sheesh. So now I need to figure out what it is and where to get the correct hub. Makes sense that it's not the right one, the rear wheel that came with it turned out to be Henderson. One step forward and two steps back....at least I hadn't painted it and laced it up to the new rim!

                Pisten Bulley is Harry Roberts in Vermont.

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                • #38
                  time to deal with the fork, the front stays were dented in multiple spots on both sides and I investigated straightening the existing tubes, but when it all was said and done I wanted a set of forks that were properly braced. The fellas at Race Metalsmiths took a look at the fork and came up with a plan, a few of the many dents in the stays:




                  Brothers Scott and Mitch convinced me that replacing the tubes was the best way to go. The old tubes were cut off and solid slugs were brazed into the casting for the new tubes to slide over and be brazed in place;



                  Mitch made a die so that the crushed tubing on the lower end, where it's brazed to the main fork, matched up perfectly with the original crush:



                  New tubes were made that matched up exactly with the old ones that were cut off, they used 4031 chromoly tubing... should be safe forks!



                  One of the things I struggle with is the decision to do it myself or let someone else do it. The guys at Race Metalsmiths know their stuff and are sensitive to matching new fabrications up to original. Lots of things are beyond my pay grade so I let the pros do it!
                  Last edited by pisten-bully; 09-26-2018, 11:53 AM.
                  Pisten Bulley is Harry Roberts in Vermont.

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                  • #39
                    Great photos and work, Harry it's coming along nicely.
                    AMCA # 3233

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                    • #40
                      Looks very good, nice work

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                      • #41
                        Very interesting work, do you have any pictures of the die they made to crush the tubing?

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by rustynutz View Post
                          Very interesting work, do you have any pictures of the die they made to crush the tubing?
                          I don't, but I think it's visible on the table in one of those pictures?
                          Pisten Bulley is Harry Roberts in Vermont.

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                          • #43
                            The hub looks like JD Harley or early WL - they are similar except for the width. Jerry

                            Originally posted by pisten-bully View Post
                            I got a bit of interesting information on my front wheel hub this morning (thanks to the sharp eyes of Dave on the Caimag site), until he mentioned the dished flange away from the brake side, I had never paid attention. Brake drum, spoke count, and rim size all looked good.... but this is not the correct hub! I measured it up and it's way wrong.... sheesh. So now I need to figure out what it is and where to get the correct hub. Makes sense that it's not the right one, the rear wheel that came with it turned out to be Henderson. One step forward and two steps back....at least I hadn't painted it and laced it up to the new rim!

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Jerry Wieland View Post
                              The hub looks like JD Harley or early WL - they are similar except for the width. Jerry
                              Thanks Jerry, this one is 3 1/8" wide. I put a listing up as I'd love to see it go where it's needed (and to recoup some of the cost to acquire the correct one from Kent Thompson!)

                              http://www.antiquemotorcycle.org/bbo...737#post174737
                              Pisten Bulley is Harry Roberts in Vermont.

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                              • #45
                                Haven't posted in nine months, sorry 'bout that!

                                I've been chipping away at small stuff and just recently started to try and hang some sheet metal. The fenders have been "roughed in" with the cracks welded, extra holes welded up, and the larger dents rolled out, but nothing approaching a finished appearance until I can get them fitting correctly.

                                The rear fender went on fairly smoothly, but I've got a large gap between the generator/seat spring plate and the fender:



                                The front fender fit nicely in the forks, but I'm looking at some fit problems where the fender stays are bolted to the fork down low.



                                The lower brackets between the stays that fit onto the fork and rocker bolt are nowhere near where they belong....

                                Last edited by pisten-bully; 06-26-2019, 05:56 PM.
                                Pisten Bulley is Harry Roberts in Vermont.

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