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Indian Vertical Rigid Tool Boxes for Trade

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  • Indian Vertical Rigid Tool Boxes for Trade

    I'm sure this has happened to a few of you. You are almost finished with a build, all you need is that one, harder to find part, than suddenly you find it. Then you realize it isn't!
    I have two Indian Vertical tool boxes for rigid frame vertical bikes. All four of my project bikes are spring frame. Guess I learned that one the hard way.
    Anyhow, if there are members who have spring frame tool boxes for trade, please let me know. We can trade condition as is, or I can touch mine up a little if yours are in better shape.
    The attached photos are images of the ones I purchased. I am only interested in trading for the correct part. These are hard to find and getting very expensive.

    Thank you.
    -JR
    36450
    Attached Files

  • #2
    I saw that box on ebay. Buying the wrong item is part of the joy of rebuilding vehicles or bikes! I never realized there was a difference in boxes between spring and rigid frames.
    I'll keep an eye out for one.
    Is the only difference the 2 external mounting brackets?
    Jason Z
    AMCA #21594
    Near Pittsburgh PA (Farm Country)
    Allegheny Mountain Chapter http://amcaamc.com/

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    • #3
      Thanks, skirted. Yes, I believe that is the only difference. There may also be a spacing difference in brazed position on the box itself. I've never had two side by side to compare them.

      The TT development notes say you can use a rigid for that particular model only if you don't use a voltage regulator. Evidently there actually was a difference between a TT spring frame and other spring frames. I have not seen one yet and didn't notice just by looking at photos.

      I actually just found one at Vintage Cycle Bay and paid up for it. bruised my ego a little, though I now have the correct part to move along the restoration.
      Now, only finding a mag, then re-building it, sending the generator for restoration, wheels and motor. Shouldn't take too much longer and things will be done.
      I already have stripper on the black one hanging in the barn. A little sand, prime and fresh paint, then maybe I can make a little money on what I'm sure is a common first-build mistake.

      -JR

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      • #4
        JR,

        Are the “TT development notes” you mentioned part of a Indian manual or are they available in print or online?

        Thx,

        Rob

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        • #5
          indianrob,

          Here you go. This is a series of typed notes, mostly word for word from the original notes as posted on something like, Wordpress.com where Jim Sutter posted many factory schematics for Indian vertical parts, including the TT cross-over upsweep exhaust. Just Google something like 'Indian factory drawings' and you should get several results matching that take you to the site where all of them have been posted in a series. very easy to navigate after that.
          In the following entries that I have typed, only one was mostly illegible and so I let the reader know that up front. There is also somewhere in the series where I accidentally left out a word. Don't recall which one.
          Hope these help you. I added the 1951 ad from Cycle Magazine because i thought it was a cool reference for the bike and decal.
          Best,
          -JR Warrior TT Development 1.jpg
          Attached Files

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          • #6
            Thanks JR!

            That’s very cool information. Thanks for sharing.

            Rob

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            • #7
              Here is the latest view of the stripped and sanded tool boxes using a double application of Stripease, a paint scraper and P50 sand paper by hand.
              Next; dremel tool sanding, prime, paint then sell or trade.
              -JR
              Attached Files

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              • #8
                Here is a spring frame model tool box. The space between both types of brackets is 2 inches exactly. The total width, edge to edge, or , outside to outside, is 3 1/2 inches exactly.
                This particular tool box appears to have been restored up to a certain point, though whoever restored the tool box did a very fine job. The brackets seem to have been re-welded to the body, though the weld only has one raised area next to the edge where you can tell they were probably a repair done by someone who knew what they were doing.
                this box came from Vintage Cycle Bay in Wildomar, CA. I will paint the box with JP 1 Fast Black and then it will be almost ready to mount on the frame.

                I saw where Gary Stark used this same type of paint, or at least sold it at one point. Does anyone know anything about using a hardener with JP 1 Fast Black.
                You can also get it at J&P Cycles online, though I don't know much about using a hardener as opposed to a lacquer coating, especially if the paint already says you don't need to use lacquer after you apply this high gloss black to your metal parts.
                -JR Acquired March 2021 VCB REF of a Spring Frame Scout Tool Box Original Tabs are higher.jpg

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                • #9
                  After a recent comparison of length, measuring vertically with the metal of the tape measure resting in the bend of the bracket, the rigids have a length of 1 and 2/8" on the outside bracket (opposite the latch end) and 1 and 3/16" on the inner (bracket closest to the latch position). The one for spring frames (pictured above) measures 2 and 5/16" each. Widths of all brackets are 3/4" on each type. I thought after comparing them on the spring frame type that the brackets look very good, but are most likely not original metal. The wear patterns are inconsistent in comparison with the other rigid original examples. They are just too clean to be original.
                  Nielson Tool & die made these at their factory in Hartford, CT.

                  Still, this is a fine tool box and someone did some fine work to bring it back.

                  I just watched the documentary film "Indian Summer," and saw that Paul Hogan was a parts source representative for Indian during the Titeflex Corporation days. He says Indian sourced out many parts during that era. This meant Indian sub-contracted other companies to acquire or make their parts. For example, there is a schematic at wordpress.com on the Indian Stewart-Warner speedometer (black face style) which has to mean some of those companies were a part of the design phase. They didn't always just go and select what a company had and add it to a model design. I thought it was odd to see that, though I guess a company could go about creating what they wanted in a couple of different ways.

                  -JR

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                  • #10
                    Hi there! My wife is restoring a 1949 scout with a spring frame. We too are looking for a spring frame tool box. What about modifying the rigid frame one to fit? Should be pretty easy I would think. I would be interested in buying one of those from you as a birthday gift for my wife. Please message me some info on what you have and the price.
                    Nothing left to do but smile, smile, smile....
                    -good ol GD

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                    • #11
                      Here are the boxes at the almost finished stage. The first four are the one box. (Sorry, I accidentally posted two photos of the same view.)
                      The second post is the second box with three photos.
                      -JR
                      Attached Files
                      Last edited by JTR249; 03-24-2021, 06:10 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Here's the second one.
                        -JR
                        Attached Files

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