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  • 36 4 cylinders

    A while back I posted about being afraid to let my 4 cylinders out of my posession do to the fact I was afraid something was going to happrn to them while being nickel plated. I was very careful to indicate certin holes were to be plugged during the plating process. Instead of plugging the valve guide holes they carefully masked off the outside of the guide, and failed to plug the hole. Now I have nickel inseide my guide holes, and the valves don't fit. This is electroless nickel so it went everywhere. Any suggestions on what to do now? the nickel is only .001 thick this means double in a hole. They did take 100.00 off of the job, but that doesn't take care of my problem. On the bright side the cylinders look great. Stan

  • #2
    Stan!

    We feel your pain.
    These things happen under the best of circumstances.

    Only a trial honing will determine if a final finish with a proper clearance can be retained. I believe it would be best to remove all traces of nickle, especially if stainless valves have been chosen.

    A full thou for electroless seems like a lot more deposit than I was ever told to expect.

    Good luck!

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    • #3
      The actual thickness is probably closer to .0008. Still not what I wanted. I have a question' what is the problem with SS and nickel? would it be a problem if Stainless valves were not used, like on the intakes. Thanks for any info. Stan

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      • #4
        Stan!

        Stainless has nickel in it, of course, so nickel on the guide would be like haveing both made of the same material. At exhaust temperatures, their affinity could cause micro-spot welds that usually turn into serious galling quickly.

        The affinity between stainless and soft cast iron alone is enough to cause this, so most stainless valves are produced with a hard chrome or nitride coating upon the stems.

        ....Cotten

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        • #5
          Stan, What was the outcome with your cylinders ? I'm reading your post with interest because my 1940 cylinders have not got much of the nickel left on them, so I was going to get them re-nickeled, what should I tell the plater to do, to avoid the issues you had ? Or shall I just paint them ??

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          • #6
            Ivor, here is the out come. You have to do all the prep work. If you depend on the platter you might as well put a gun to your head. Everything has to be plugged and the cylinder walls have to be coated in lead tape. If there is a screw up at this point. It's on you. Platters know no more about you cylinders than a dish towel rack. They plate things, that's it. Bob L

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            • #7
              Thanks Bob, That sound real scary to me, this four has been agony, every step of the way, so maybe I will just spray them silver, it would be nicer to have them nickeled but I don't think I could stand another disaster. Thanks again, Ivor.

              Comment


              • #8
                That sound real scary to me, this four has been agony, every step of the way

                Just realized that now, huh??? LOL.
                D. A. Bagin #3166 AKA Panheadzz 440 48chief W/sidecar 57fl 57flh 58fl 66m-50 68flh 70xlh

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                • #9
                  Ivor, I have plated my own cylinders with the Caswell electroless nickel kit. It is a lot of work, and will cost you about $300 for the kit, but you don't have worry about someone stealing them, or breaking a fin (unless you don't trust yourself . As Bob Luland mentioned, you can get lead tape from McMaster Carr, to mask the cylinder walls, and valve seats, or ask Caswell for a masking liquid. If you choose to plate them yourself, it is critical that your cylinders are surgically clean, as well as rust, and oil free. I should again say, it's a LOT of work, but very satisfying as well.
                  Eric Smith
                  AMCA #886

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                  • #10
                    Thanks Eric, Do you mean flashband tape with black bitumen on the back that is used for roof repairs and flashing or the 1/2" wide tape that is used to ad weight to golf clubs ?

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                    • #11
                      Below is a link to McMaster Carr, who offers lead tape for that purpose. It's not cheap, but I know it works because friend of mine used it on his '35 Chief cylinders.

                      https://www.mcmaster.com/lead-foil-tape
                      Eric Smith
                      AMCA #886

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by stan View Post
                        A while back I posted about being afraid to let my 4 cylinders out of my posession do to the fact I was afraid something was going to happrn to them while being nickel plated. I was very careful to indicate certin holes were to be plugged during the plating process. Instead of plugging the valve guide holes they carefully masked off the outside of the guide, and failed to plug the hole. Now I have nickel inseide my guide holes, and the valves don't fit. This is electroless nickel so it went everywhere. Any suggestions on what to do now? the nickel is only .001 thick this means double in a hole. They did take 100.00 off of the job, but that doesn't take care of my problem. On the bright side the cylinders look great. Stan


                        Hi Stan, I just had a guy tell me that he thought my 1940 cylinders should be painted not nickel-ed. Do you or anyone else know what year fours were nickel-ed and what year fours were painted ?
                        Thankyou, Ivor.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Your cylinders were nickel plated, I'm not sure when (how early) they started but your 1940 Four was nickel. The '38 -42 Indian Fours all had nickel plated cylinders from the factory. So did the Chiefs and Scouts from the pre-war period. Painting cylinders started on post-war Chiefs 46 - 53.

                          A lot of folks opt for the painted cylinder look due to cost and ease of maintaining them.
                          Last edited by Green Indian; 10-29-2018, 02:49 PM.
                          AMCA # 3233

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Green Indian View Post
                            Your cylinders were nickel plated, I'm not sure when (how early) they started but your 1940 Four was nickel. The '38 -42 Indian Fours all had nickel plated cylinders from the factory. So did the Chiefs and Scouts from the pre-war period. Painting cylinders started on post-war Chiefs 46 - 53.

                            A lot of folks opt for the painted cylinder look due to cost and ease of maintaining them.

                            Thanks Green, I was in 'Two minds' But, After reading your reply, I think that I will paint them. At least I know that the correct finish is nickel.

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