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  • #16
    Wel I picked this guy up last week from a friend of a friend. He threw a bbq and i saw this sitting on his shelf, he decided to make me an offer i couldnt refuse so now ive got a big project!

    image.jpg

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    • #17
      Hell yeah! Let us know if you start a build thread, I'd love to watch along.
      AMCA Member #27624

      1914 Harley Thread (trying to get her running again)
      http://www.antiquemotorcycle.org/bbo...ars-of-sitting

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      • #18
        Although I have never owned a Brit bike, it seems they are available and do not cost an arm and a leg. Parts and support seem to be no problem. When you have one that is well sorted out, you will have a fun, good handling motorcycle that represents a wonderful era of motorcycling in America ('50s & '60s).
        George Tinkham
        Springfield, IL
        www.virmc.com

        1941 Indian 841
        1948 Indian Chief
        1956 H-D KHK
        1960 CH
        1964 BMW R69S
        1966 Honda Touring Benly (aka "150 Dream")
        1984 Moto Guzzi V65Sp

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        • #19
          Keating Wheel Company--1935 VL Ford Flatty. *M.A.D.DSCN1726.JPG **P.S. Or watch the YouTube Video (1935 Harley Davidson VL-V8 60HP).
          Last edited by JoJo357; 01-08-2017, 12:23 AM. Reason: additional info.

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          • #20
            sean - 45 was my first antique, still have it, smile every time i ride it. 3 speed, 50 mph tops. chicks dig them...

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            • #21
              Hello
              Early 1950's or late 40's 45WL would be a good old bike to have if you want a Harley. I would stay away from anything in the 1930's, trust me on this one, although they are the most beautiful (1933 is the best paint display on any Harley ever made) , they are hard to fix and parts (even after market) are expensive and hard to find. A lot of these bikes got scrapped in WW2 and Euros bought a lot of them too .Production #'s were low during the depression. The late 40's and early 50's WL's are beautiful and less complicated. All hand shifters are somewhat dangerous to ride .They have limited brakes and suspension so you have to ride them carefully ,and hopefully sober.Speed is not that important ,and you can get bucked off with only one hand on the bars. Just my 2 cents on the little I have learned. Good luck !!

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              • #22
                Good going Sean, you'll have a ball,
                My first 45, I was 15 yrs old when I bought it as a non runner with a blown trans, I was 16 in this pic,soon to purchase a basket Knucklehead, my first big twin...

                Last edited by Rubone; 03-23-2017, 10:31 PM.
                Robbie Knight Amca #2736

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                • #23
                  A 60's 70's Triumph wouldn't be a bad place to start for a build. Still reasonably priced and parts and updates are all out there and relatively easy to find. But really, pick something that speaks to you on some level then go for it.

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