Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Charles Lindbergh

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • EricOlson
    replied
    A couple more of Lindbergh taken in the early 1920's. How's this for unique, one apparently taken by him while riding.

    Charles A. Lindbergh with his motorcycle ca 1923 or 1924.jpg

    Charles A. Lindbergh in Indiana. Taken from a motorcycle in 1923 or 1924.jpg

    Leave a comment:


  • EricOlson
    replied
    And here's one of Charles Lindbergh riding along with Sacramento Mayor Alexander E. Goddard taken after his historical flight. He's not on a bike, but they're not far away. Who's to say he didn't take one for a spin when the parade was over?

    Charles Lindbergh in car along with Sacramento Mayor Alexander E. Goddard seated at his left. Taken after his historical flight (2).jpg

    Leave a comment:


  • EricOlson
    replied
    A few pictures I came across of Lindbergh on a motorcycle

    Charles A.Lindbergh is Seeing new thrills, by experimenting at ... Associated Press Photo from San Francisco Bureau (2).jpgCHarles A. Lindbergh on a motorcycle (2).jpgCharles A Lindbergh on a motorcycle surrounded by a group of men (2).jpgCharles A. Lindbergh, who deserted his gliding experiments ... Associated Press Photo from San Francisco Bureau (2).jpg

    Leave a comment:


  • JoJo357
    replied
    Unfortunately, the Lindbergh X is currently Not on public Display.

    https://www.thehenryford.org/collect...lide=gs-556345

    *M.A.D.*
    Last edited by JoJo357; 09-04-2021, 04:07 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Freeman
    replied
    Awesome history, and all the releases.

    Leave a comment:


  • tmckinch
    replied
    What an Awesome story of an amazing man. Thank You

    Leave a comment:


  • grease monkey
    replied
    Great research! That throws an interesting new light on my "reliable source!" It actually made my day to hear that ! Thanks !

    Leave a comment:


  • JoJo357
    replied
    Great information & articles. Restored Lindbergh Excelsior 'Series 20'. Henry Ford Museum, Dearborn, Michigan.

    *M.A.D.*

    fullsizeoutput_141d.jpeg
    Last edited by JoJo357; 06-24-2021, 12:39 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • gharper
    replied
    Grease Monkey: Regarding your statement: "I heard from a reliable source that rather than restore the engine he just put another engine in the bike !"

    All due respect, but I would have to call BS on that "reliable source" and here is why. Years ago, I saw the Lindbergh bike in the Henry Ford museum. I used a crayon and piece of paper (from one of the many children's exhibits that were set up to let the kids make rubbings of fun things at the museum) and quickly stepped over the ropes to get a rubbing of the serial number of Lindberghs bike. The number I rubbed was 104083. This falls right in the 1920 range of Excelsior serial numbers. I always wondered if that was actually his motorcycle. Years later when I was researching Lindbergh we went to the Lindbergh Family museum in Little Falls Minnesota. In a display case was a photo of the rear of his motorcycle with him working on it. The photo clearly showed the Wisconsin license plate. Along with that photo was the original license plate and the registration card for the plate which clearly showed the serial number of 104083. So to me, that confirms that the engine in the motorcycle at the Henry Ford is clearly Lindbergh's motor and there is no reason to believe the chassis is not.

    The exhibit in the museum incorrectly states he purchased his motorcycle in 1918. That was actually in late 1919, as per Lindbergh's personal writings.

    Lindbergh's registration.jpgLindbergh's license plates.jpg

    Leave a comment:


  • exeric
    replied
    Restoration of original paint bikes was commonly done in this hobby. I don't want to get into some lengthy debate about the morality of that, but we all know that in the '50s and '60s old bikes, and cars were not expensive and the hobby of collecting, and restoring them was considered the domain of nuts, and weirdoes. Considered even crazier were people who left those cars, and bikes in original condition. Times change, as do opinions, and tastes so I don't like to beat up people from the past who did what they thought was proper at the time. I just thought it was odd that a museum curator (regardless of the era) would have approved of sandblasting the original finish off an object that had so much provenance.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jerry Wieland
    replied
    You don't have to go too far back and you can see it in the AMCA. A former Chief Judge now deceased in an article that was published in the newsletter made the statement that if an original paint bike had any defect it needed to be restored.


    Originally posted by exeric View Post
    I remember that article in the 'Antique Motorcycle' magazine that Charlie did. I also recall that the X was sandblasted, but I didn't recall that it was that way when Ted started his restoration. It surprises me that any curator at a museum that treasures historical objects would allow sandblasting a motorcycle with such a famous owner. Just looking at the sandblasted condition makes me believe it was probably very presentable in it's original state. That is why I was curious if there were any photos from before it was - - - well, you know

    Leave a comment:


  • exeric
    replied
    I remember that article in the 'Antique Motorcycle' magazine that Charlie did. I also recall that the X was sandblasted, but I didn't recall that it was that way when Ted started his restoration. It surprises me that any curator at a museum that treasures historical objects would allow sandblasting a motorcycle with such a famous owner. Just looking at the sandblasted condition makes me believe it was probably very presentable in it's original state. That is why I was curious if there were any photos from before it was - - - well, you know

    Leave a comment:


  • grease monkey
    replied
    I heard from a reliable source that rather than restore the engine he just put another engine in the bike !

    Leave a comment:


  • EricOlson
    replied
    Originally posted by gharper View Post
    Look that story up and read it, it's pretty interesting.
    A quick search turned up the following link, where you can read a copy of the story. http://www.charleslindbergh.com/history/motorcycle.asp Looking forward to reading it when I have a few spare minutes.

    Leave a comment:


  • gharper
    replied
    Eric,

    Lindbergh's motorcycle is still at the Henry Ford in Michigan, though I hear it is in storage and not on display. Ted wrote an article for the Antique Automobile Association after he restored it. Charlie Carter reprinted it in the Fall 1974 issue, volume 13, no.3. In that article is a photo of the "before" condition. The motorcycle was on display with the acetylene headlight brackets reversed, so the light stuck up about a foot. Lindbergh did add an acetylene light sometime after the trip he took in 1921. The worst thing of all was that the entire motorcycle had been sandblasted and then clear coated. It was horrible and when Ted saw it in the early 60's he was compelled to do something about that. Look that story up and read it, it's pretty interesting.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X