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Thread: Gas Tank sealing?

  1. #1

    Default Gas Tank sealing?

    Hello all,
    I am restoring my 58 FL and the one tank was really badly rusted out .... I had to soak in evaporust for a week to get the rust out... there were pin holes in one spot... my painter was able to weld the pin holes up and the tank pressure tested ok for leaks.... he suggested sealing since the metal was so thin... I didnít want to seal the inside but wanted to see what the restoration gurus thought...
    thanks everyone for your help!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    4,831

    Default

    I'm nobody's guru, Steve!

    But its like this:

    Your welder aught to know that any future repairs are a helluva lot easier without a goober in the way.

    ….Cotten
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    92

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    I had a rad shop do the red coat on two sets of tanks at the same time my 1948 and a customers when I was running my shop, the customer tells me that hers gummed up and she had to have the carB rebuilt after. However my 48 sat for a year before fuel went in and is good to this day. Both were done at the same time.

    Craig

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    The First State
    Posts
    248

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    Just from my experience, I had my 45" tanks coated many years ago. The fuel side seems to be holding well but the oil side tank is flaking off when the oil gets hot and gumming up my oil pump. So now I'm in the process of trying to remove the stuff from my oil tank.
    Craig (Delaware)
    Perkiomen Chapter
    AMCA Member #1011

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    107

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    I had a set done by a local shop that uses Fuel Tank-Renu. if you not worrying about paint.
    Pressure checked when done and guaranteed, expensive but I was happy with there work.
    Moyers Fuel Tank-Renu
    Greensburg, Pa.
    1-800-328-9550
    IMG_2553.jpg
    IMG_2555.jpg

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    The First State
    Posts
    248

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 55tmm View Post
    I had a set done by a local shop that uses Fuel Tank-Renu. if you not worrying about paint.
    Pressure checked when done and guaranteed, expensive but I was happy with there work.
    Moyers Fuel Tank-Renu
    Greensburg, Pa.
    1-800-328-9550
    IMG_2553.jpg
    IMG_2555.jpg
    I heard lots of good stuff about that shop. I called them about my 45" tanks but they were hesitant since I already had a coating inside.
    Craig (Delaware)
    Perkiomen Chapter
    AMCA Member #1011

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    518

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Galli View Post
    Hello all,
    I am restoring my 58 FL and the one tank was really badly rusted out .... I had to soak in evaporust for a week to get the rust out... there were pin holes in one spot... my painter was able to weld the pin holes up and the tank pressure tested ok for leaks.... he suggested sealing since the metal was so thin... I didn’t want to seal the inside but wanted to see what the restoration gurus thought...
    thanks everyone for your help!
    Isn't there an advertisement in our magazine that fixes tanks? I think they tin coat the tanks before repairing. Not sure if that is the place already mentioned.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    4,400

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    Harley tanks are, by far the easiest tanks to repair because they are well formed, heavy gauge, and can be welded, or brazed. The back panels can be removed by carefully grinding the weld seams thus allowing access to the inside of the tank. You can also cut bad sections out, and weld, or braze repair sections in. I've done many tanks from Flying Merkel, Henderson, Excelsior, Indian, and most recently a Honda Black Bomber and H-D's '36 and later tanks are still the easiest, and best. I also use tank sealers, and I use Red Kote. Tank sealers are controversial, and will always start an argument but tank sealer failure is most often due to improper preparation of the surface it's put on. That last sentence is what always starts the argument
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    4,831

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by exeric View Post
    Harley tanks are, by far the easiest tanks to repair because they are well formed, heavy gauge, and can be welded, or brazed. The back panels can be removed by carefully grinding the weld seams thus allowing access to the inside of the tank. You can also cut bad sections out, and weld, or braze repair sections in. I've done many tanks from Flying Merkel, Henderson, Excelsior, Indian, and most recently a Honda Black Bomber and H-D's '36 and later tanks are still the easiest, and best. I also use tank sealers, and I use Red Kote. Tank sealers are controversial, and will always start an argument but tank sealer failure is most often due to improper preparation of the surface it's put on. That last sentence is what always starts the argument
    So Eric!

    How does a 'weld' or 'braze' go after you have goobered them?

    Just asking for a friend.

    ....Cotten
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    4,400

    Default

    I'm not going there. Find another chump.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

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