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Thread: Gas tank cleaning with acetone

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    114

    Default Gas tank cleaning with acetone

    I'm getting ready to remove the kreem coating inside my gas tanks (paint not an issue) but can't find anything that is acetone resistant in order to seal the various openings. What are folks using and where can I find it?
    Louis

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    NW Ct.
    Posts
    107

    Default

    I don't know if they're acetone resistant or not, but how about rubber stoppers from the hardware store? Hope this helps.....Smitty

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    189

    Default

    I use an old gas cap with a cork or old rubber gasket for the gas fill area. For the other openings I use rubber stoppers or plastic cap plugs. None of these materials is acetone resistant for long term exposure but will work OK for the short time it will take to dissolve the creme. You will likely get some pressure build up during the process so open the gas cap slowly when you check the progress. Unless you're very careful, you'll also get some of the solution on the outside surfaces of the tank when you remove the gas cap but since you don't care about the paint that's OK. Just a bit messy and stinky.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    114

    Default

    Thanks for the inputs. It turns out I have really been over thinking this. I read someplace that acetone does not effect cork, I had a large chunk of cork in my garage so roughly cut the size I would need to plug the gas line connection holes and filled one of the sides to the brim and put a gas cap on with rubber gasket. The rubber gasket will be trash but those are cheap enough. I'll give the acetone a day or two and see how it turns out. It's a good thing the paint is no concern because those cans the acetone comes in do not pour very well.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    England
    Posts
    1,414

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    The expensive tank sealant remover I bought turned out to be carbon tetrachloride rather than acetone. Having an economical streak, I later used the contents of old Pyrene fire extinguishers, which is the same stuff. It took more than a day or two per tank, and you may need help such as shaking the tank with a handful of nuts and bolts inside. The modern gas is very aggressive, so you need really clean tanks to get a good bond for the new sealer.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    114

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    So, after I've removed the old kreem liner I'm undecided on what product to use as a new coating. I've looked at red kote and por-15 and both seem like good products, but. There are some folks who don't recommend using any type of liner and I know Cotten mentioned using a phosphate coating on another thread. I've searched the internet and can't find what or how to do this. So Cotten, what product would I use to phosphate coat my tanks and how to you apply it?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    163

    Default

    Why coat them again?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    100

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    I have been using Red Kote for quite a while with great results. Be careful when you use it as it will build up pressure in the tank while you are rotating the tank around with it fully sealed. Due to ethanol in modern fuels, the fuel tends to attract moisture and causes rust in the tank. I am lazy and do not feel like running to the airport for ethanol free fuel every time I ride an old machine.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    England
    Posts
    1,414

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    I've used a two component tank sealer here in the UK on maybe four sets of tanks, but one of them was lifting a year later. The tanks have to be completely clean and dry, you need to warm the tanks as you slosh round the sealer, then it needs to cure for a week at a warm room temperature. The modern wet gas also rusts the steel plugs in brass Harley gas taps, so after a long period standing you cut rust into the valve body the first time you turn it on.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Menomonie, WI
    Posts
    1,365

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    I would never just coat them because it is 'a good idea'. If they don't need it - don't coat them in fact I go to the ends of the earth not to coat them.

    Jerry

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