Page 13 of 29 FirstFirst ... 3111213141523 ... LastLast
Results 121 to 130 of 282

Thread: '27 JD Cut Down Project - SWAN

  1. #121
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    334

    Default

    Steve,
    Didn't NASA miss one of their targets because they mixed metric and imperial units?
    I don't know how much braking power you have picked up, but it looks the part.

  2. #122
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    1 mile east of the Rocky Mountains.
    Posts
    969

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by aumick10 View Post
    Steve,
    Didn't NASA miss one of their targets because they mixed metric and imperial units?
    I don't know how much braking power you have picked up, but it looks the part.
    Hey Mick! i guess i'll find out the first time i squeeze the brake lever ! it DOES, as you say, look the part. i think it'll be at least sufficient, certainly at elast as good and i wold imagine better than the original rear brake and certainly not any less than what i've seen on a number of Cannonball bikes and i sure as heck don't plan to be riding bat out of hell style around local roads and can't imagine running more than 50-55 mph tops on open highways. i actually feel half-assed comfortable riding my restored '27 on local roads with only the original rear brake, so with a perhaps slightly less than nominal front brake and a definitely less than nominal rear brake i should end up with a nominal front brake... i really wanted to keep the 21" wheel as uncluttered as possible so i think i accomplished that at least and i don't like the looks of a huge drum brake like i've seen on other customs.
    Last edited by Steve Swan; 03-07-2019 at 07:10 PM.

  3. #123
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    530

    Default

    Steve, Those will do the trick. Remember the rear brake (stock J model) will lock up the rear wheel and that's too much. You only have braking up to impending skid and lockup. The front is good for rolling up to lights, when you have your other limbs engaged, and emergencies. Your good to go.
    DrSprocket

  4. #124
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    334

    Default

    Steve,
    Another month and you will have something to hang it from.
    As you say, it is better than no front brake, you may be able to cruise at 60-80 mph with some confidence.
    With a front and rear brake, the weight transfer gives you over 60% of your braking power on the front.
    Is there something missing from the brake hub? I don't remember the fixed shoe anchor being open as it looks. I thought it was a bolted shoe anchor through the backing plate, with a nut and washer on the outside.
    Cheers,
    Mick.

  5. #125
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    1 mile east of the Rocky Mountains.
    Posts
    969

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by aumick10 View Post
    Steve,
    Another month and you will have something to hang it from.
    As you say, it is better than no front brake, you may be able to cruise at 60-80 mph with some confidence.
    With a front and rear brake, the weight transfer gives you over 60% of your braking power on the front.
    Is there something missing from the brake hub? I don't remember the fixed shoe anchor being open as it looks. I thought it was a bolted shoe anchor through the backing plate, with a nut and washer on the outside.
    Cheers,
    Mick.
    Mick, if i understand correctly your observations on the fixed shoe anchor and the bolted shoe anchor:

    1. the "open" hole you see is a hollow post/stud (typically a fixed shaft) the brake shoes "rotate" on. and opposite this hollow post is the fulcrum pin that expands shoes. hollow i would imagine because Kawasaki designed it to increase weight savings.

    2. the hole the chrome bolt threads into is simply a through (open) hole and was Kawasaki's design to simply hold a strap in place that connected the strap from that bolt to the fork leg, this hole serves no purpose other than to fix this strap to the backing plate and to the fork leg. this through (open) hole actually comes out underneath the middle of the rear brake shoe if any of all this i wrote is coherent enough to make sense...

    3. so we are looking at three things in the picture: 1. The hole the chrome bolt threads into to hold the fixing strap that keeps the baking plate from rotating. 2. The open hole (directly behind the brass cable adjusting screw) which is actually a fixed hollow post/stud the shoes "rotate" on, and 3. of course the fulcrum pin that the lever actuates that expands the brake shoe which is about 1-1/2 inches wide by 7 inches in diameter.

    hope this clarifies!

    YES!!!!!!! THANKS TO YOU, in another month i will have "something" to hang all my pieces i've been collecting on !!!!!! Looking forward to meeting yu and THANK YOU AGAIN FOR YOUR GENEROUS HELP !
    Last edited by Steve Swan; 03-08-2019 at 12:44 AM.

  6. #126
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    1 mile east of the Rocky Mountains.
    Posts
    969

    Default

    PS - cruising 60-80 on that jalopy freaks me out! 55 is fast enough! or maybe a mile a minute. will be interesting to see what the fewer teeth i will be running on the engine sprocket and rear wheel sprocket will actually do....!
    Last edited by Steve Swan; 03-08-2019 at 12:42 AM.

  7. #127
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    1 mile east of the Rocky Mountains.
    Posts
    969

    Default

    Mick, what's cool if you study that brake is the fulcrum pin is hollow as well as the fixed shoe anchor and as is the main axle which i bored out to slip the original '27 axle through. High-tech 1980's motocross stuff, i am sure you noticed the Magnesium backing plate! so once i have the forks you sold me, then i can make the appropriate width spacers to center the wheel between the fork rockers and in line with the rear wheel.

  8. #128

    Default

    Steve, I read and enjoy all of the updates and progress. other than saying I dig this build, technically I can't offer anything lol. the "love" is there friend.

  9. #129
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    1 mile east of the Rocky Mountains.
    Posts
    969

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nuklhd View Post
    Steve, I read and enjoy all of the updates and progress. other than saying I dig this build, technically I can't offer anything lol. the "love" is there friend.
    THANK YOU nuklhead! I APPRECIATE YOUR WORDS OF ENCOURAGEMENT! the project is tapping my resources, so every now and then my knee's start knockin'! but knockin' knees is nothing new to me as every spare coin i've ever had after the family is cared for and living expenses are met has ALWAYS gone to motorcycles! (and a few antique firearms, and at least an annual motorbike trip!) i'd rather use some replaceable or not otherwise terribly valuable or difficult to find oddball parts to piece the project together. so, i am using what i have or parts that have some meaning to me. My dad's first car was a 1917 Model T which i think i mentioned earlier and of course i shared the Duane Dreesen story on the Velo fishtail silencer. as out of place as some of the parts will be in respect to most the pictures of cut down's i've seen i think if i give things some thought to how to fit the parts together it will look at least as good as Frankenstein!
    Last edited by Steve Swan; 03-10-2019 at 07:05 PM.

  10. #130
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    1 mile east of the Rocky Mountains.
    Posts
    969

    Default

    My buddy Wiff weighing the lower end parts yesterday afternoon. Wiff is 76, he's been riding since he was 12, every New Year's eve right before midnight he takes his bike out and goes for a ride until right afte the clock strike midnight, that way he can say he rode out of one year and into another, Wiff hasn't missed his New Year's ride in over 40 years. He was a machinist for Kodak for 35 years. Wiff worked for a well-ran local mom & pop repair shop for 27 years along with working at Kodak; i got to work as a mechanic the last 3 years the shop was open. Ray's Motorcycle; Ray has been a locally competitive racer his entire time in the motorcycle industry, he's 70 now, he started when he was 16. attached is a picture of Ray the day i finished my '27's restoration.

    20190311_165833.jpg20190311_170024.jpg20170511_122658.jpg

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •