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Fair asking price for 1974 FXE?

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  • Fair asking price for 1974 FXE?

    Getting ready to sell my 1974 FXE. Would say about 95% original. Tank OP, fenders repaint. Rear wheel aftermarket, original goes with the bike.
    Pipes/muffler aftermarket. Have NOS pipes, no mufflers. Good running machine. Great base for someone to have a stock FXE.
    Have seen prices all over the place......Whats a fair asking price? Clean Title with all correct, matching info. Thoughts???


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  • #2
    Don't quote a price.
    Invite an offer.
    The Linkert Book

    Comment


    • #3
      Yours looks like a nice clean bike. How many miles? How long have you owned it? What, if any, work has it had done to it?
      Steve Swan

      27JD 11090 Restored
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ClUPIOo7-o8
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LtuptEAlU30

      27JD 13514 aka "Frank"
      https://forum.antiquemotorcycle.org/...n-Project-SWAN
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNRB...nnel=steveswan

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RSDeuTqD9Ks
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bwlIsZKmsTY

      Comment


      • #4
        You are right, prices all over the place. Depends on where you live, I think. $4500-7K more in Cali, less in midwest.
        AMCA #41287
        1971 Sprint SS350 project
        1982 FXR - AMCA 98.5 point restoration
        1979 FXS 1200 never done playing
        1998 Dyna Convertible - 100% Original
        96" Evo Softail self built chopper
        2012 103" Road King "per diem"
        plus 13 other bikes over the years...

        Comment


        • #5
          Sweet FXE Eddie~brings back many good memories. Don't know if You can always count on the eBaY figures, but this 1972 FX went for $10,500 a few weeks ago. Original AMF's are getting decent cash lately. Good Luck.

          https://youtu.be/I6WPvafHExw

          *M.A.D.*
          Last edited by JoJo357; 11-15-2022, 06:23 AM.

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          • #6
            Sweet bike,I agree with 9-10K or so.I build a couple of Shovels every year for customers,from projects & baskets.Parts & labor add up.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Steve Swan View Post
              Yours looks like a nice clean bike. How many miles? How long have you owned it? What, if any, work has it had done to it?
              Steve,
              I've owned the bike for approximately 17 yrs. No clue on the miles, didn't have a speedo when I got it. I have done little to no work on it as far as mechanicals go. Have done tuneups and fluid changes. Have replaced all the tins it came with. Gave it a new wiring harness, new tires and brake pads, new coil & found the correct seat for it Basically took stock bones and moved it back towards being correct. Engine and tranny runs well and are quite. Still has the original shift pattern of 1 up, 3 down. Fun bike as compared to older fl's

              Comment


              • #8
                I have an older (2018) copy of the NADA Vintage, Collectible and Retro Motorcycle Appraisal Guide. A"guide" to valuations that I have been using for many years. I know my copy is very much out of date, (I should send for a current price schedule). yet a basic thumbnail tool for many of the bikes I am not familiar with. Here's what my book reveals.

                HD and Indians use 5 categories in the description schedule. #1 is excellent; #2 is very good; #3 is good; #4 is fair; #5 is poor. Usually, these ratings are a bit liberal and subjective. This is only a guide and not meant in any way to reflect the actual valuation between buyer and seller.

                1974 HD FXE Super Glide
                #1 14985
                #2 9900
                #3 6735
                #4 5165
                #5 3730

                NADA collector Guides are available annually. customer service inquiries- (800)966-6232

                My opinion,based solely on the single pic above and the description provided by the poster here is somewhere between a low #1 and a high #2. A pretty big spread, indeed. I will say this...
                This FXE is well appointed and in great shape !! It should be expected to sell for "top dollar". Don't hesitate to ask for a premium. Good Luck !! C2K

                Comment


                • #9
                  Keep it ! it's a nice looking bike
                  http://www.harley-memories.com
                  http://harley8valves.wordpress.com/
                  AMCA Membership#5701

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    A quick word about price guides like nada.

                    I grew up in the auto business. I use nada a lot. Nada is excellent for general values, but the big rub is pretty much nothing qualifies for number 1 value. Those are truly exceptional vehicles and considerably more rare than imagined.

                    hint number 1 you do not have a #1 is if it needs anything or comes with parts to make it 100 percent. A number one is 100 percent without any excuses or blemishes. Think 99 point winners circle that isn’t ridden but starts on first kick every time.

                    instead, for most good original or well restored bikes, take the number two condition and add 10-20 percent depending on your region. 30 percent if you have receipts from well known shops to verify condition and you have a popular model.

                    also the guys who pay the most tend to be “birth year” buyers. I’ve gotten a lot of those guys to over pay because they feel a connection to the bike. That’s where number three bikes sell for 1 or 2 money and skew things.

                    Ymmv.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by chuckthebeatertruck View Post
                      A quick word about price guides like nada.

                      I grew up in the auto business. I use nada a lot. Nada is excellent for general values, but the big rub is pretty much nothing qualifies for number 1 value. Those are truly exceptional vehicles and considerably more rare than imagined.

                      hint number 1 you do not have a #1 is if it needs anything or comes with parts to make it 100 percent. A number one is 100 percent without any excuses or blemishes. Think 99 point winners circle that isn’t ridden but starts on first kick every time.

                      instead, for most good original or well restored bikes, take the number two condition and add 10-20 percent depending on your region. 30 percent if you have receipts from well known shops to verify condition and you have a popular model.

                      also the guys who pay the most tend to be “birth year” buyers. I’ve gotten a lot of those guys to over pay because they feel a connection to the bike. That’s where number three bikes sell for 1 or 2 money and skew things.

                      Ymmv.
                      Thanks, Chuck, for that interesting perspective of you experienced observations on NADA valuation!
                      Steve Swan

                      27JD 11090 Restored
                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ClUPIOo7-o8
                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LtuptEAlU30

                      27JD 13514 aka "Frank"
                      https://forum.antiquemotorcycle.org/...n-Project-SWAN
                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNRB...nnel=steveswan

                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RSDeuTqD9Ks
                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bwlIsZKmsTY

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Happy to share, Steve.

                        I share because it was like clock work in the autumn that guys would show up with classic cars or restored bikes to trade on a new vehicle for the other half. They'd always roll in with the KBB or NADA #1 value highlighted and expected the dealership would give them that value. I used to run into this all the time buying bikes too -- #5 bikes were always #3 in the minds of owners.


                        It's very, very common for folks in the old vehicle community to over-estimate the condition of their vehicle by at least one category. A lot of solid threes are thought of as "low one or high two" by the owners. To a third, non-emotionally involved party, the condition is often lower than the owner imagines.

                        Oh, and appraisals aren't often tied to market. I've had more than one seller over the years scream they had a $10,000 appraisal on a $5000 bike. Many were from new bike dealers or from antique appraisers -- neither of which deal in antique bikes. They seemed to base their "valuation" on whatever sold at a Mecum auction. These are often the worst values because emotion and money chasing has really inflated sales prices. A lot of the bikes sold at Mecum in recent years are at best shiny #3 yet sold for nearly #1 money -- and a lot of them come back on market pretty fast as the new owners discover they aren't #1.

                        This is partially why valuing stuff off a picture and a description is often highly subjective at best.

                        Not trying to burst anyone's bubbles and I hope we all get top dollar.

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                        • #13
                          Thanks for all the feedback, I always learn from you guys!
                          Posted this in the For Sale area.

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